Martha Washington Show, Spartanburg

Event details

  • January 12, 2018
  • 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
  • Headquarters Library, Barrett Room, 151 S Church St, Spartanburg, SC
  • (864) 596-3503

 View Map  |  Cost: Free

Portrayed by Maggie Worsdale

On the upcoming 237th anniversary of the stunning Patriot victory at the Battle of Cowpens, let us (as Abigail Adams, another Revolutionary Grande Dame, urged her husband John) – also “Remember the Ladies.”

You see, women wanted independence just as much as the men. Martha Washington has a lot to say about these other Grande Dames – their courage, what they risked, and how they influenced the outcome of the Revolution. These are stories that are begging to be told.

You’ll laugh – you’ll be amazed – you’ll have questions. And Martha Washington will answer them.

Martha Washington will be portrayed by Maggie Worsdale from the Traveling Literary Theater, Charleston, SC.

Free Show and Free parking


Maggie Worsdale holds a B.A. degree in Theater and English from Marietta College. Performing professionally as a jazz singer for the past 30 years, Worsdale has entertained throughout the U.S. and Europe. Sharing the stage with Bob Hope and George Burns opened the door for recording four personal albums and has been featured on three.

In 2005, Worsdale began producing traveling literary programs with a small troupe of professional actors. In 2012, TRAVELING LITERARY THEATER was recognized nationally with the production of 100 Years – TITANIC – survivors and their stories. In the spring of 2013, after 18 months of research and writing, Maggie began her historical figure portrayal as Martha Washington. Worsdale is a member of NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY PROJECT – Writing Women Back into History.
marthawashington.com
travelingliterarytheater.com
nwhp.org/southcarolina

Ladies Who Are Not Well Known In Their Own Right , But Are Remembered for who They Married.” – Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was a charter member of that club!

She lived in the shadow of her husband’s greatness, but she emerged as the most famous woman of her time. Her obituary described her as truly a “worthy partner” for the foremost man of the times.

As the men at Valley Forge were chanting, “No bread, no soldier,”  it was Martha Washington who arrived on the scene with supplies from Mount Vernon. She and other officers’ wives, including Kitty Greene and Lucy Knox, left their children and joined their husbands. She traveled every year to winter quarters with her husband.  She emerged as a selfless, courageous and patriotic American.

Martha Washington became indispensable as a nurse and comfort to Washington and his men. One witness to her activities wrote: “I never in my life knew a woman so busy from early morning until late at night as was Lady Washington, providing comforts for the sick soldiers.”

Martha Washington – daughter of the wealthy Dandridge family, widow of Daniel Parke Custis (even more wealthy) – was the richest woman in Virginia, yet she became a Revolutionary and risked her family’s fortune and her very life.

You see, women wanted independence just as much as the men.

The impact that ladies had on the revolutionary effort did not take center stage in our nation’s story. Martha Washington is known through her husband’s fame. But there are many other women revolutionaries not as celebrated. They all had one thing in common – patriotic passion. These women were steadfast, dependable and assisted in every way imaginable, many even risking their own lives.

Martha Washington has a lot to say about these other Grande Dames – their courage, what they risked, and how they influenced the outcome of the Revolution. These are stories that are begging to be told.

On this anniversary of the stunning Patriot victory at the Battle of Cowpens, let us (as Abigail Adams, another Revolutionary Grande Dame, urged her husband John) – also  “Remember the Ladies.”

1973 – Born Martha Dandridge

1749 – Marries Daniel Custis and has two children – Patsy and Jacky

1759 – Marries Col Geo Washington after Daniel Custis dies. Moves to Mount Vernon

1775 – 1789 George becomes leader of Revolutionary army and Martha joins him at winter encampments. Both her children die and she becomes guardian of her son Jacky’s two children.

1789 – President and “Lady” Washington relocate to Philadelphia

1797 – After two terms, they return to Mount Vernon

1799 – George dies

1802 – Martha dies

  • “I little thought, when the war was finished, that any circumstances could possibly have happened, which would call the General into public life again. I had anticipated that, from this moment, we should have been left to grow old, in solitude and tranquillity, together. That was, my dear madam, the first and dearest wish of my heart; but in that I have been disappointed.  I will not, however, contemplate, with too much regret, disappointments that were inevitable. Though the General’s feelings and my own were perfectly in unison, with respect to our predilection for private life, yet I cannot blame him, for having acted according to his ideas of duty, in obeying the voice of his country. The consciousness of having attempted to do all the good in his power, and the pleasure of finding his fellow-citizens so well satisfied with the disinterestedness of his conduct, will doubtless be some compensation for the great sacrifices, which I know he has made.”
  • “Every body and every thing conspire to make me as contented as possible in it; yet I have seen too much of the vanity of human affairs, to expect felicity from the splendid scenes of public life. I am still determined to be cheerful and to be happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have also learnt, from experience, that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances. We carry the seeds of the one or the other about with us, in our minds, wheresoever we go.”
  • Martha Washington, an American Life by Patricia Brady, 2005.
    A painstakingly researched book that reveals Martha as an indomitable patriot, shrew diplomat, and emotional mainstay.
  • The General and Mrs. Washington: The Untold Story of a Marriage and a Revolution by Bruce Chadwick, 2006.
    Here is the story of the fateful marriage of the richest woman in Virginia and the man who could have been king. In telling their story, Chadwick explains not only their remarkable devotion to each other, but why the wealthiest couple in Virginia became revolutionaries who risked the loss of their vast estates and their very lives.